how to write a student commentary

Student Commentaries (#CL351) on Cicero De Natura Deorum or De Divinatione

You must include the following elements:

  1. Choose a passage of at least 350 words; you may copy + paste the text from thelatinlibrary.com, but note that there may be textual differences, so make sure to check against the text
  2. Write an introduction to the passage that contains information about the author’s life and work, the genre of the selection, and an overview or outline of the work from which the passage is taken
  3. Write a reflection, based on research (use bibliography on syllabus), about the broader significance of the content of the passage, and how it relates to the rest of the work
  4. Write a translation of the Latin passage in your own words
  5. Give a bibliography of print and internet sources consulted
  6. [optional: A print-out of images that illustrate the text, with references]
  7. Comments to the text arising from student reading, such as:
    • complete dictionary entries for less-common words with the recommended translation for the word, as it is used in the immediate context, placed first, followed by a range of possible meanings
    • explication of grammatical forms, syntax, word order, rhetorical devices
    • identification of people, places, events, references
    • interpretation of ideas in the text and meaning that is not readily apparent

An example of a student commentary on Aeneid 2.771-775.

Students of the current CL 351 produced the following (partial) commentary with me on ND 1.3ff., Tuesday 12th October. Asterisks denote passages which will need to be filled in by further reference and research. What is nice about this, the product of a very short workshop, is how many ideas can be generated from even a little piece of text. And the asterisks are an index of initial thoughts which can be developed with further investigation.


Classroom test case:
De Natura Deorum 1.3-7

[3] Sunt enim philosophi et fuerunt, qui omnino nullam habere censerent rerum humanarum procurationem deos. Quorum si vera sententia est, quae potest esse pietas, quae sanctitas, quae religio? Haec enim omnia pure atque caste tribuenda deorum numini ita sunt, si animadvertuntur ab iis et si est aliquid a deis inmortalibus hominum generi tributum; sin autem dei neque possunt nos iuvare nec volunt nec omnino curant nec, quid agamus, animadvertunt nec est, quod ab is ad hominum vitam permanare possit, quid est, quod ullos deis inmortalibus cultus, honores, preces adhibeamus? In specie autem fictae simulationis sicut reliquae virtutes item pietas inesse non potest; cum qua simul sanctitatem et religionem tolli necesse est, quibus sublatis perturbatio vitae sequitur et magna confusio; [4] atque haut scio, an pietate adversus deos sublata fides etiam et societas generis humani et una excellentissuma virtus iustitia tollatur. Sunt autem alii philosophi, et hi quidem magni atque nobiles, qui deorum mente atque ratione omnem mundum administrari et regi censeant, neque vero id solum, sed etiam ab isdem hominum vitae consuli et provideri; nam et fruges et reliqua, quae terra pariat, et tempestates ac temporum varietates caelique mutationes, quibus omnia, quae terra gignat, maturata pubescant, a dis inmortalibus tribui generi humano putant, multaque, quae dicentur, in his libris colligunt, quae talia sunt, ut ea ipsa dei inmortales ad usum hominum fabricati paene videantur. Contra quos Carneades ita multa disseruit, ut excitaret homines non socordes ad veri investigandi cupiditatem. [5] Res enim nulla est, de qua tantopere non solum indocti, sed etiam docti dissentiant; quorum opiniones cum tam variae sint tamque inter se dissidentes, alterum fieri profecto potest, ut earum nulla, alterum certe non potest, ut plus una vera sit. Qua quidem in causa et benivolos obiurgatores placare et invidos vituperatores confutare possumus, ut alteros reprehendisse paeniteat, alteri didicisse se gaudeant; nam qui admonent amice, docendi sunt, qui inimice insectantur, repellendi. [6] Multum autem fluxisse video de libris nostris, quos compluris brevi tempore edidimus, variumque sermonem partim admirantium, unde hoc philosophandi nobis subito studium extitisset, partim, quid quaque de re certi haberemus, scire cupientium; multis etiam sensi mirabile videri eam nobis potissimum probatam esse philosophiam, quae lucem eriperet et quasi noctem quandam rebus offunderet, desertaeque disciplinae et iam pridem relictae patrocinium necopinatum a nobis esse susceptum.

Commentaries:
— Pease commentary [available online thro’ Haithi]; this is at the more dense end of the spectrum
— Dyck commentary [Mugar: PA6296 .D4 2003]
— P. G. Walsh commentary [Mugar: PA6308.D4 W35 1997]

Databases:
phi latin corpus < use this to find how other authors use words or phrases
Brill New Pauly < use this to look up unknown names
Logeion < use this to look up words in Lewis & Short
Allen & Greenough online < use this to look up and reference grammar/syntax
jstor.org < use this to look up scholarly articles

 

 

*NB this assignment is modelled on the Companion Text-Commentary exercise. 

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Syllabuses for Fall 2017

 

 

I’m teaching two undergraduate classes this Fall: Women in Antiquity (#CL206), a class which is crosslisted with gender studies; and a Latin Seminar on Cicero’s De Natura Deorum and De Divinatione, “Gods and the Universe” (#CL351). Both of the syllabuses are online (see below). I’m keen to have a public element to these classes, so I’ll be tweeting about them using the hashtags #CL206 and #CL351. Students, or anyone, can join me on twitter in discussing these topics. The Women in Antiquity class will have a stronger social media component, with weekly blog posts from me to develop a set of questions for the week’s readings, to generate IDs, and to dialogue with in-class discussion.